Why are so many babies tongue tied?

Tongue ties are being blamed on social media for a slew of woes affecting infants—from nipple pain to poor napping to speech issues—but many experts agree that the rise in diagnosis and treatment is being led by consumer demand rather than by hard science.

What percentage of babies have tongue tie?

Tongue-tie is common, affecting nearly 5 percent of all newborns. It is three times more common among boys than girls and frequently runs in families. Research has shown that a significant number of infants with breastfeeding problems have tongue tie, and that when corrected, those problems are eliminated.

Do babies grow out of tongue tie?

If left alone, the tongue-tie will often resolve itself on its own as the baby’s mouth grows.

Is Baby tongue tie surgery necessary?

Babies with tongue-ties rarely need surgery to help them feed, a US study suggests. It found two-thirds of babies referred for the procedure did not need it and were able to feed with other support.

What happens if you don’t fix tongue tie?

Some of the problems that can occur when tongue tie is left untreated include the following: Oral health problems: These can occur in older children who still have tongue tie. This condition makes it harder to keep teeth clean, which increases the risk of tooth decay and gum problems.

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At what age can tongue tie be treated?

Tongue-tie occurs when a string of tissue under the tongue stops the tongue from moving well. Tongue-tie can improve on its own by the age of two or three years. Severe cases of tongue-tie can be treated by cutting the tissue under the tongue (the frenum). This is called a frenectomy.

Does cutting tongue tie hurt baby?

Tongue-tie division is done by doctors, nurses or midwives. In very young babies (those who are only a few months old), it is usually done without anaesthetic (painkilling medicine), or with a local anaesthetic that numbs the tongue. The procedure does not seem to hurt babies.

Are Tongue ties genetic?

Anyone can develop tongue-tie. In some cases, tongue-tie is hereditary (runs in the family). The condition occurs up to 10 percent of children (depending on the study and definition of tongue-tie). Tongue-tie mostly affects infants and younger children, but older children and adults may also live with the condition.

Can a tongue tie affect speech?

Tongue-tie will not affect a child’s ability to learn speech and will not cause speech delay, but it may cause issues with articulation, or the way the words are pronounced.

What does a tongue tie look like in a baby?

Identifying tongue tie

When your baby tries to lift his tongue or move it forwards it may appear misshapen, short or heart-shaped, with the frenulum clearly pulling its centre down and restricting its movement. Or you may be able to see or feel firm tissue where his tongue meets the floor of his mouth.

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What do I do if my baby has a tongue-tie?

See a doctor if:

  1. Your baby has signs of tongue-tie that cause problems, such as having trouble breast-feeding.
  2. A speech-language pathologist thinks your child’s speech is affected by tongue-tie.
  3. Your older child complains of tongue problems that interfere with eating, speaking or reaching the back teeth.

Can you fix tongue-tie without surgery?

Non-surgical procedures: There are new non-invasive procedures that can be used to help manage the effects of tongue-tie. These non-surgical approaches include lactation interventions to help babies latch on and breastfeed effectively, as well as speech therapy.

How painful is tongue tie surgery?

And there are different kinds of tongue-tie surgeries. Fortunately, the frenulum doesn’t have a lot of nerves and blood vessels, so the surgery won’t normally cause much pain or a lot of bleeding.

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